Google Play Music Presents: City Soundtracks

Love discovering new places? Love music? Google Play Music has you covered with our first original podcast series—City Soundtracks. Hear your favorite musicians talk about important people, places, and moments in their lives, and how their hometown roots have influenced them.  

City Soundtracks Logo

In each episode, host Hrishikesh Hirway (Song ExploderWest Wing Weekly) invites musicians to take listeners on a tour of their hometown. Each episode, a blend of interesting conversation and music, is paired with a playlist curated by the featured guest, so you can discover new songs or enjoy some of the music you already love.

You can listen now on Google Play Music or wherever you enjoy your podcasts (available in the US and Canada).

Kehlani – Oakland, CA

Kehlani grew up all over the East Bay. She is only 21 years old, but already has an impressive musical career. In this episode, she shares how growing up in and around Oakland shaped her into the musician she is today.

LISTEN NOW

Big Freedia – New Orleans, LA

Big Freedia, Queen of Bounce, is a musical ambassador of New Orleans. She has helped this local, underground scene turn into a national phenomenon. Join us as Big Freedia takes us on a tour of her personal musical landmarks in her favorite town.

LISTEN NOW

Spoon – Austin, TX

Spoon first formed in 1993, when Britt Daniel met Jim Eno in a recording studio in a basement at the University of Texas at Austin. Britt and Jim take us on a tour of Austin, Texas. They share stories about venues old and new, their home studio, and their motel hideaway for writing music.

LISTEN NOW

Who run the world? How we’re celebrating International Women’s Day

Lee Tai-Young was Korea’s first female lawyer and first female judge. Cecilia Grierson was the first woman to receive a medical degree in Argentina. And Ida B. Wells was a newspaper editor by age 25 and one of the founders of the NAACP. These are a few of the remarkable women you’ll meet in today’s Doodle celebrating International Women’s Day, one of several ways we’re raising awareness about the contributions of women, past and present, throughout Women’s History Month. We’re also supporting efforts to close the gender gap in tech and other fields. Read on for a look at what we’re doing to recognize women across media, culture, leadership and more this month.

Celebrating historical heroines

In today’s interactive slideshow Doodle, a young girl goes on an imaginary journey to meet 13 female trailblazers from throughout history. From a pilot in Egypt to a dancer in India, these women may not all be household names, but they’ve all made a unique mark on the world. In fact, all of them have been celebrated in a Doodle in the past, but often only in their countries of origin. Today, we’re sharing their stories worldwide.

IWD doodle

After your journey, learn more about all of the women in the Doodle in a new Spotlight Story from Google Arts & Culture. See the São Paulo Museum of Art, designed by Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi, or the Phoenician alphabet tablet with which Halet Cambel deciphered Hittite hieroglyphics. You can also find more exhibits on notable women from throughout history on our Women in Culture page. You might just meet a new heroine!

A day in the life of women astronauts, pilots and engineers with VR

Today’s Doodle introduces you to notable women of the past, but what about the women of today and tomorrow? With Expeditions, more than 2 million students have gone on 500+ virtual field trips to places like Machu Picchu and the International Space Station using Google Cardboard. Today we’re adding 40 new Expeditions to this collection, all focused on on the careers, adventures, and contributions of women.

NASA women

The new Expeditions highlight everyone from astronauts, airplane pilots, engineers and photographers to the female firefighters of the FDNY. They open a window into a typical day on the job—whether in a recording studio or a cockpit, explain the person’s backstory and reveal how she got to where she is today. Some also offer advice to students interested in pursuing a similar career. Download the app on iOS and Android to get started.

Recognizing inspirational women on YouTube

Rosie Rios, an inspiring woman in her own right as the 43rd Treasurer of the United States, led the efforts to put a woman on U.S. currency. That meant learning more about the hundreds of American women who made great contributions to the history of this country. Now she’s created a special playlist for YouTube Kids called “Super Women of Our Past” that introduces young people to some of these women, from Eleanor Roosevelt to Harriet Tubman to Grace Hopper.  Watch with the YouTube Kids app. You can also find other, related playlists, like “Celebrate Women’s History Month” and “Celebrate International Women’s Day.”

YouTUbe Kids playlist

YouTube is also working to turn up the volume on inspirational women’s voices through the #HerVoiceIsMyVoice campaign. We hope you’ll join by sharing a video of a woman whose voice speaks to you.

Her Voice is My Voice

Tracking screen time

GDIQ
The Geena Davis Inclusion Quotient (GD-IQ) tool uses machine learning to detect different characters on-screen, determine their gender, and calculate how often and for how long they spoke in relation to one another.

Media can play a huge part in empowering women to discover new careers, but often the characters we see on screen aren’t very diverse. Recently, our machine learning team worked with the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and USC Viterbi School of Engineering to develop a new tool that uses machine learning to measure how often we see and hear women on screen. We then put the software to work, analyzing the 100 highest-grossing live-action films from the past three years. The tool revealed that men are seen and heard nearly twice as often as women. In Academy Award-winning films, women make up just 32 percent of screen time and 27 percent of speaking time. In a world where girls are only half as likely as boys to have CS role models, representation matters. Over time, we hope this project can help raise awareness of the “missing women” in media, encourage filmmakers to include a broader range of characters, and introduce young people to more diverse role models.

Coming together in the community

We’re also participating in or hosting dozens of events supporting women at Google and in tech. Last weekend we held the first of many Women Techmakers summits, which offer hands-on coding workshops on TensorFlow, networking opportunities and inspiring speakers. Women Techmakers is also sponsoring more than 140 community meetups for women in tech worldwide. Many of our 120 Women@Google employee resource group chapters are hosting events—from career development workshops to civic action weeks—in cities around the world. And at our Cloud Next event headed by Diane Greene, VP of Google Cloud, we’ll feature women leaders from Google and partners in a panel on diversity and inclusion. And of course, we’re also supporting Googlers who choose to participate in other grassroots efforts marking International Women’s Day.

The She Word: spotlighting women Googlers

There are thousands of powerful, dynamic and creative women at Google. This month, you can get to know some of them right here on the Keyword and our Instagram account, starting with Alexandrina Garcia-verdin, whose personal hero is Frida Kahlo, and Tea Uglow, who loves coffee (but not tea).

These are just a few of the women who inspire us. We hope you’ll share some of your own. Whether it’s empowering female voices as part of #HerVoiceIsMyVoice, or telling your personal story with #TodayIAm, we’re excited to hear it.

Google Play Music Presents: City Soundtracks

Love discovering new places? Love music? Google Play Music has you covered with our first original podcast series—City Soundtracks. Hear your favorite musicians talk about important people, places, and moments in their lives, and how their hometown roots have influenced them.  

City Soundtracks Logo

In each episode, host Hrishikesh Hirway (Song ExploderWest Wing Weekly) invites musicians to take listeners on a tour of their hometown. Each episode, a blend of interesting conversation and music, is paired with a playlist curated by the featured guest, so you can discover new songs or enjoy some of the music you already love.

You can listen now on Google Play Music or wherever you enjoy your podcasts (available in the US and Canada).

Kehlani – Oakland, CA

Kehlani grew up all over the East Bay. She is only 21 years old, but already has an impressive musical career. In this episode, she shares how growing up in and around Oakland shaped her into the musician she is today.

LISTEN NOW

Big Freedia – New Orleans, LA

Big Freedia, Queen of Bounce, is a musical ambassador of New Orleans. She has helped this local, underground scene turn into a national phenomenon. Join us as Big Freedia takes us on a tour of her personal musical landmarks in her favorite town.

LISTEN NOW

Spoon – Austin, TX

Spoon first formed in 1993, when Britt Daniel met Jim Eno in a recording studio in a basement at the University of Texas at Austin. Britt and Jim take us on a tour of Austin, Texas. They share stories about venues old and new, their home studio, and their motel hideaway for writing music.

LISTEN NOW

Who run the world? How we’re celebrating International Women’s Day

Lee Tai-Young was Korea’s first female lawyer and first female judge. Cecilia Grierson was the first woman to receive a medical degree in Argentina. And Ida B. Wells was a newspaper editor by age 25 and one of the founders of the NAACP. These are a few of the remarkable women you’ll meet in today’s Doodle celebrating International Women’s Day, one of several ways we’re raising awareness about the contributions of women, past and present, throughout Women’s History Month. We’re also supporting efforts to close the gender gap in tech and other fields. Read on for a look at what we’re doing to recognize women across media, culture, leadership and more this month.

Celebrating historical heroines

In today’s interactive slideshow Doodle, a young girl goes on an imaginary journey to meet 13 female trailblazers from throughout history. From a pilot in Egypt to a dancer in India, these women may not all be household names, but they’ve all made a unique mark on the world. In fact, all of them have been celebrated in a Doodle in the past, but often only in their countries of origin. Today, we’re sharing their stories worldwide.

IWD doodle

After your journey, learn more about all of the women in the Doodle in a new Spotlight Story from Google Arts & Culture. See the São Paulo Museum of Art, designed by Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi, or the Phoenician alphabet tablet with which Halet Cambel deciphered Hittite hieroglyphics. You can also find more exhibits on notable women from throughout history on our Women in Culture page. You might just meet a new heroine!

A day in the life of women astronauts, pilots and engineers with VR

Today’s Doodle introduces you to notable women of the past, but what about the women of today and tomorrow? With Expeditions, more than 2 million students have gone on 500+ virtual field trips to places like Machu Picchu and the International Space Station using Google Cardboard. Today we’re adding 40 new Expeditions to this collection, all focused on on the careers, adventures, and contributions of women.

IWD_NASAWomen(3).jpg

The new Expeditions highlight everyone from astronauts, airplane pilots, engineers and photographers to the female firefighters of the FDNY. They open a window into a typical day on the job—whether in a recording studio or a cockpit, explain the person’s backstory and reveal how she got to where she is today. Some also offer advice to students interested in pursuing a similar career. Download the app on iOS and Android to get started.

Recognizing inspirational women on YouTube

Rosie Rios, an inspiring woman in her own right as the 43rd Treasurer of the United States, led the efforts to put a woman on U.S. currency. That meant learning more about the hundreds of American women who made great contributions to the history of this country. Now she’s created a special playlist for YouTube Kids called “Super Women of Our Past” that introduces young people to some of these women, from Eleanor Roosevelt to Harriet Tubman to Grace Hopper.  Watch with the YouTube Kids app. You can also find other, related playlists, like “Celebrate Women’s History Month” and “Celebrate International Women’s Day.”

IWD_NASAWomen(2).jpg

YouTube is also working to turn up the volume on inspirational women’s voices through the #HerVoiceIsMyVoice campaign. We hope you’ll join by sharing a video of a woman whose voice speaks to you.

Her Voice is My Voice

Tracking screen time

GDIQ
The Geena Davis Inclusion Quotient (GD-IQ) tool uses machine learning to detect different characters on-screen, determine their gender, and calculate how often and for how long they spoke in relation to one another.

Media can play a huge part in empowering women to discover new careers, but often the characters we see on screen aren’t very diverse. Recently, our machine learning team worked with the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and USC Viterbi School of Engineering to develop a new tool that uses machine learning to measure how often we see and hear women on screen. We then put the software to work, analyzing the 100 highest-grossing live-action films from the past three years. The tool revealed that men are seen and heard nearly twice as often as women. In Academy Award-winning films, women make up just 32 percent of screen time and 27 percent of speaking time. In a world where girls are only half as likely as boys to have CS role models, representation matters. Over time, we hope this project can help raise awareness of the “missing women” in media, encourage filmmakers to include a broader range of characters, and introduce young people to more diverse role models.

Coming together in the community

We’re also participating in or hosting dozens of events supporting women at Google and in tech. Last weekend we held the first of many Women Techmakers summits, which offer hands-on coding workshops on TensorFlow, networking opportunities and inspiring speakers. Women Techmakers is also sponsoring more than 140 community meetups for women in tech worldwide. Many of our 120 Women@Google employee resource group chapters are hosting events—from career development workshops to civic action weeks—in cities around the world. And at our Cloud Next event headed by Diane Greene, SVP of Google Cloud, we’ll feature women leaders from Google and partners in a panel on diversity and inclusion. And of course, we’re also supporting Googlers who choose to participate in other grassroots efforts marking International Women’s Day.

The She Word: spotlighting women Googlers

There are thousands of powerful, dynamic and creative women at Google. This month, you can get to know some of them right here on the Keyword and our Instagram account, starting with Alexandrina Garcia-verdin, whose personal hero is Frida Kahlo, and Tea Uglow, who loves coffee (but not tea).

These are just a few of the women who inspire us. We hope you’ll share some of your own. Whether it’s empowering female voices as part of #HerVoiceIsMyVoice, or telling your personal story with #TodayIAm, we’re excited to hear it.

Google Play Music Presents: City Soundtracks

Love discovering new places? Love music? Google Play Music has you covered with our first original podcast series—City Soundtracks. Hear your favorite musicians talk about important people, places, and moments in their lives, and how their hometown roots have influenced them.  

City Soundtracks Logo

In each episode, host Hrishikesh Hirway (Song ExploderWest Wing Weekly) invites musicians to take listeners on a tour of their hometown. Each episode, a blend of interesting conversation and music, is paired with a playlist curated by the featured guest, so you can discover new songs or enjoy some of the music you already love.

You can listen now on Google Play Music or wherever you enjoy your podcasts (available in the US and Canada).

Kehlani – Oakland, CA

Kehlani grew up all over the East Bay. She is only 21 years old, but already has an impressive musical career. In this episode, she shares how growing up in and around Oakland shaped her into the musician she is today.

LISTEN NOW

Big Freedia – New Orleans, LA

Big Freedia, Queen of Bounce, is a musical ambassador of New Orleans. She has helped this local, underground scene turn into a national phenomenon. Join us as Big Freedia takes us on a tour of her personal musical landmarks in her favorite town.

LISTEN NOW

Spoon – Austin, TX

Spoon first formed in 1993, when Britt Daniel met Jim Eno in a recording studio in a basement at the University of Texas at Austin. Britt and Jim take us on a tour of Austin, Texas. They share stories about venues old and new, their home studio, and their motel hideaway for writing music.

LISTEN NOW

Who run the world? How we’re celebrating International Women’s Day

Lee Tai-Young was Korea’s first female lawyer and first female judge. Cecilia Grierson was the first woman to receive a medical degree in Argentina. And Ida B. Wells was a newspaper editor by age 25 and one of the founders of the NAACP. These are a few of the remarkable women you’ll meet in today’s Doodle celebrating International Women’s Day, one of several ways we’re raising awareness about the contributions of women, past and present, throughout Women’s History Month. We’re also supporting efforts to close the gender gap in tech and other fields. Read on for a look at what we’re doing to recognize women across media, culture, leadership and more this month.

Celebrating historical heroines

In today’s interactive slideshow Doodle, a young girl goes on an imaginary journey to meet 13 female trailblazers from throughout history. From a pilot in Egypt to a dancer in India, these women may not all be household names, but they’ve all made a unique mark on the world. In fact, all of them have been celebrated in a Doodle in the past, but often only in their countries of origin. Today, we’re sharing their stories worldwide.

IWD doodle

After your journey, learn more about all of the women in the Doodle in a new Spotlight Story from Google Arts & Culture. See the São Paulo Museum of Art, designed by Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi, or the Phoenician alphabet tablet with which Halet Cambel deciphered Hittite hieroglyphics. You can also find more exhibits on notable women from throughout history on our Women in Culture page. You might just meet a new heroine!

A day in the life of women astronauts, pilots and engineers with VR

Today’s Doodle introduces you to notable women of the past, but what about the women of today and tomorrow? With Expeditions, more than 2 million students have gone on 500+ virtual field trips to places like Machu Picchu and the International Space Station using Google Cardboard. Today we’re adding 40 new Expeditions to this collection, all focused on on the careers, adventures, and contributions of women.

IWD_NASAWomen(3).jpg

The new Expeditions highlight everyone from astronauts, airplane pilots, engineers and photographers to the female firefighters of the FDNY. They open a window into a typical day on the job—whether in a recording studio or a cockpit, explain the person’s backstory and reveal how she got to where she is today. Some also offer advice to students interested in pursuing a similar career. Download the app on iOS and Android to get started.

Recognizing inspirational women on YouTube

Rosie Rios, an inspiring woman in her own right as the 43rd Treasurer of the United States, led the efforts to put a woman on U.S. currency. That meant learning more about the hundreds of American women who made great contributions to the history of this country. Now she’s created a special playlist for YouTube Kids called “Super Women of Our Past” that introduces young people to some of these women, from Eleanor Roosevelt to Harriet Tubman to Grace Hopper.  Watch with the YouTube Kids app. You can also find other, related playlists, like “Celebrate Women’s History Month” and “Celebrate International Women’s Day.”

IWD_NASAWomen(2).jpg

YouTube is also working to turn up the volume on inspirational women’s voices through the #HerVoiceIsMyVoice campaign. We hope you’ll join by sharing a video of a woman whose voice speaks to you.

Her Voice is My Voice

Tracking screen time

GDIQ
The Geena Davis Inclusion Quotient (GD-IQ) tool uses machine learning to detect different characters on-screen, determine their gender, and calculate how often and for how long they spoke in relation to one another.

Media can play a huge part in empowering women to discover new careers, but often the characters we see on screen aren’t very diverse. Recently, our machine learning team worked with the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and USC Viterbi School of Engineering to develop a new tool that uses machine learning to measure how often we see and hear women on screen. We then put the software to work, analyzing the 100 highest-grossing live-action films from the past three years. The tool revealed that men are seen and heard nearly twice as often as women. In Academy Award-winning films, women make up just 32 percent of screen time and 27 percent of speaking time. In a world where girls are only half as likely as boys to have CS role models, representation matters. Over time, we hope this project can help raise awareness of the “missing women” in media, encourage filmmakers to include a broader range of characters, and introduce young people to more diverse role models.

Coming together in the community

We’re also participating in or hosting dozens of events supporting women at Google and in tech. Last weekend we held the first of many Women Techmakers summits, which offer hands-on coding workshops on TensorFlow, networking opportunities and inspiring speakers. Women Techmakers is also sponsoring more than 140 community meetups for women in tech worldwide. Many of our 120 Women@Google employee resource group chapters are hosting events—from career development workshops to civic action weeks—in cities around the world. And at our Cloud Next event headed by Diane Greene, SVP of Google Cloud, we’ll feature women leaders from Google and partners in a panel on diversity and inclusion. And of course, we’re also supporting Googlers who choose to participate in other grassroots efforts marking International Women’s Day.

The She Word: spotlighting women Googlers

There are thousands of powerful, dynamic and creative women at Google. This month, you can get to know some of them right here on the Keyword and our Instagram account, starting with Alexandrina Garcia-verdin, whose personal hero is Frida Kahlo, and Tea Uglow, who loves coffee (but not tea).

These are just a few of the women who inspire us. We hope you’ll share some of your own. Whether it’s empowering female voices as part of #HerVoiceIsMyVoice, or telling your personal story with #TodayIAm, we’re excited to hear it.

Chrome expands business opportunities with Android Kiosk apps and improved device management

Over time, we’ve continued to create new and better ways to use Chrome devices. What started out as a secure, quick and shareable consumer laptop built on the Chrome browser has expanded to digital signage, now used in thousands of Toyota showrooms, small computing sticks called Chromebits, and kiosk devices that securely provide single use apps for both business employees and customers.

We’re continuing to invest in Chrome through recently launched hardware, more Chrome device management controls and the introduction of Android Kiosk apps on devices that support them. Many kiosk devices already rely on Android applications, so the addition of Android kiosk apps on Chrome is a natural expansion. It also broadens the possibilities for digital signs and kiosks on Chrome devices, providing the option of either a web or Android app approach.

Chrome version 57, coming soon, adds this support for Android kiosk apps as well as for kiosk application management. An app in Google Play can be pushed to a Chrome device and then be locked down so that the application is front and center.

That means an IT admin has the flexibility to install either Chrome Kiosk apps or Android Kiosk apps on managed devices through the Chrome Management console, which decreases deployment time and effort. Additionally, with Public Session Kiosks, an IT admin has the ability to install many more Chrome packaged apps and extensions in addition to hosted apps.

Kiosk app management

We’re also making it easier to manage Chrome devices with two additional developments.

First, we’re making it simple for you to sign up for a Chrome kiosk, doing away with complex domain registration and verification steps. Your name, email address and phone number is all you need to sign up and manage your devices. With this feature, we also provide two trial licenses so that you can get started immediately. Click here to learn more.

Second, we’re launching a new Chrome Device Management (CDM) APIs for Kiosks. These APIs offer programmatic access to various Kiosk policies. IT admins can schedule a device reboot through the new APIs, for example, and integrate that functionality directly in a third party console. Additionally, we added a new stability API that allows Kiosk app developers to improve the reliability of the application and the system.

Many Chrome devices can take full advantage of these new features including the recently launched AOPEN Chromebox mini and Chromebase mini.

CrowdDJ Android app on Chromebase mini

Chromebase mini is a full computing device with 10.1-inch touchscreen, which is ideal for customer-facing applications, even those that are Android-based. Australia-based Nightlife Music, for example, installs its crowdDJ Android app on these kiosk devices at dance clubs, gyms, hotels and other venues, letting customers control the beat. When paired with a display, the AOPEN Chromebox mini also creates a compelling digital sign with Chrome and Android kiosk apps.

To learn more about the many new Chrome 57 features and see the AOPEN devices that can help build your business, come visit our booth at Next 2017 this week or visit this page for additional information.

Chrome expands business opportunities with Android Kiosk apps and improved device management

Over time, we’ve continued to create new and better ways to use Chrome devices. What started out as a secure, quick and shareable consumer laptop built on the Chrome browser has expanded to digital signage, now used in thousands of Toyota showrooms, small computing sticks called Chromebits, and kiosk devices that securely provide single use apps for both business employees and customers.

We’re continuing to invest in Chrome through recently launched hardware, more Chrome device management controls and the introduction of Android Kiosk apps on devices that support them. Many kiosk devices already rely on Android applications, so the addition of Android kiosk apps on Chrome is a natural expansion. It also broadens the possibilities for digital signs and kiosks on Chrome devices, providing the option of either a web or Android app approach.

Chrome version 57, coming soon, adds this support for Android kiosk apps as well as for kiosk application management. An app in Google Play can be pushed to a Chrome device and then be locked down so that the application is front and center.

That means an IT admin has the flexibility to install either Chrome Kiosk apps or Android Kiosk apps on managed devices through the Chrome Management console, which decreases deployment time and effort. Additionally, with Public Session Kiosks, an IT admin has the ability to install many more Chrome packaged apps and extensions in addition to hosted apps.

Kiosk app management

We’re also making it easier to manage Chrome devices with two additional developments.

First, we’re making it simple for you to sign up for a Chrome kiosk, doing away with complex domain registration and verification steps. Your name, email address and phone number is all you need to sign up and manage your devices. With this feature, we also provide two trial licenses so that you can get started immediately. Click here to learn more.

Second, we’re launching a new Chrome Device Management (CDM) APIs for Kiosks. These APIs offer programmatic access to various Kiosk policies. IT admins can schedule a device reboot through the new APIs, for example, and integrate that functionality directly in a third party console. Additionally, we added a new stability API that allows Kiosk app developers to improve the reliability of the application and the system.

Many Chrome devices can take full advantage of these new features including the recently launched AOPEN Chromebox mini and Chromebase mini.

CrowdDJ Android app on Chromebase mini

Chromebase mini is a full computing device with 10.1-inch touchscreen, which is ideal for customer-facing applications, even those that are Android-based. Australia-based Nightlife Music, for example, installs its crowdDJ Android app on these kiosk devices at dance clubs, gyms, hotels and other venues, letting customers control the beat. When paired with a display, the AOPEN Chromebox mini also creates a compelling digital sign with Chrome and Android kiosk apps.

To learn more about the many new Chrome 57 features and see the AOPEN devices that can help build your business, come visit our booth at Next 2017 this week or visit this page for additional information.

Chrome expands business opportunities with Android Kiosk apps and improved device management

Over time, we’ve continued to create new and better ways to use Chrome devices. What started out as a secure, quick and shareable consumer laptop built on the Chrome browser has expanded to digital signage, now used in thousands of Toyota showrooms, small computing sticks called Chromebits, and kiosk devices that securely provide single use apps for both business employees and customers.

We’re continuing to invest in Chrome through recently launched hardware, more Chrome device management controls and the introduction of Android Kiosk apps on devices that support them. Many kiosk devices already rely on Android applications, so the addition of Android kiosk apps on Chrome is a natural expansion. It also broadens the possibilities for digital signs and kiosks on Chrome devices, providing the option of either a web or Android app approach.

Chrome version 57, coming soon, adds this support for Android kiosk apps as well as for kiosk application management. An app in Google Play can be pushed to a Chrome device and then be locked down so that the application is front and center.

That means an IT admin has the flexibility to install either Chrome Kiosk apps or Android Kiosk apps on managed devices through the Chrome Management console, which decreases deployment time and effort. Additionally, with Public Session Kiosks, an IT admin has the ability to install many more Chrome packaged apps and extensions in addition to hosted apps.

Kiosk app management

We’re also making it easier to manage Chrome devices with two additional developments.

First, we’re making it simple for you to sign up for a Chrome kiosk, doing away with complex domain registration and verification steps. Your name, email address and phone number is all you need to sign up and manage your devices. With this feature, we also provide two trial licenses so that you can get started immediately. Click here to learn more.

Second, we’re launching a new Chrome Device Management (CDM) APIs for Kiosks. These APIs offer programmatic access to various Kiosk policies. IT admins can schedule a device reboot through the new APIs, for example, and integrate that functionality directly in a third party console. Additionally, we added a new stability API that allows Kiosk app developers to improve the reliability of the application and the system.

Many Chrome devices can take full advantage of these new features including the recently launched AOPEN Chromebox mini and Chromebase mini.

CrowdDJ Android app on Chromebase mini

Chromebase mini is a full computing device with 10.1-inch touchscreen, which is ideal for customer-facing applications, even those that are Android-based. Australia-based Nightlife Music, for example, installs its crowdDJ Android app on these kiosk devices at dance clubs, gyms, hotels and other venues, letting customers control the beat. When paired with a display, the AOPEN Chromebox mini also creates a compelling digital sign with Chrome and Android kiosk apps.

To learn more about the many new Chrome 57 features and see the AOPEN devices that can help build your business, come visit our booth at Next 2017 this week or visit this page for additional information.

Lowering barriers to technology adoption: three tips from City Schools of Decatur

Editor’s note: Schools are working with Google for Education Premier Partners to throw open their doors for the ExploreEDU event series, which invites neighboring educators to learn first-hand from their own experiences using Google tools. To see if there’s an event near you, visit the ExploreEDU site. Today’s guest author is Eston Melton, Director of Technology from City Schools of Decatur in Decatur, GA. The district hosted an event on February 22 at Google’s Atlanta office with their partner Promevo.

At City Schools of Decatur, we believe that technology should feel like an instinctive part of teaching and learning. Since adopting G Suite for Education in 2015 and Chromebooks in 2016, we’ve focused on making it as easy as possible for teachers and students to use new technology. Here are our main takeaways for lowering barriers to integrating technology:

1. Anticipate future needs

Four years ago, our fourth graders were issued one-to-one tablets. As these students approached eighth grade, our middle school’s leadership wanted to transition them to a device that would be easier to maintain while still meeting the requirements of our students’ learning; Chromebooks were identified as the solution. But after we deployed Chromebooks, we realized that we could have expanded the device vetting process district-wide to identify good fits for lower and higher grade levels at the same time. For instance, some elementary schools were keen to add Chromebooks, but needed a different type of Chromebook to fit smaller learners. To help us better anticipate such needs in the future, we’re creating a diverse team of IT staff, teachers, students and parents to standardize how we vet services and devices for all corners of our instructional program. This team will ensure that we can support successful initiatives that others could adopt down the road—not only for devices, but also the critical training and ongoing support needed to get the most from them.

2. Create clear access policies for teachers and students

Being thoughtful about how files and other materials are shared between students, teachers and administrators is critical. In one of my previous districts, students and staff initially had separate G Suite domains, which meant teachers and students struggled to share materials with each other. We avoided this issue at City Schools of Decatur because we set up both students and staff on a single G Suite domain, and our IT department created G Suite organizational units for staff and students that made setting different levels of permissions easy. That ease of sharing also meant that it was important to train staff on being deliberate with their sharing permissions in Drive. Comfort with Drive has allowed many of our teachers to use Google Classroom to share materials and assignments.

CitySchools_Decatur_teacher.png
Students using Chromebooks for online coursework guided by their teacher in the background. Photo credit: Katie Meyer.

3. Encourage experimentation in the classroom

We encourage students and teachers to experiment with technology so they can learn what works best for their own styles and needs. G Suite for Education lets students try new presentation styles by giving them access to collaborative tools such as Sheets and Slides. Students can also reach audiences beyond their peers by sharing their work with the public on channels such as our 3ten Convergence Media’s YouTube channel or our English students’ creative writing Blogger sites.

Students aren’t the only ones who experiment—we see staff use Google tools to implement quick improvements in their work as well. For example, when it was time for students to select their courses, our staff recognized that our course selection site featuring static PDFs was not user-friendly. Using Google Sites, our staff was able to rapidly implement several cycles of feedback to create an improved site, made better with an instructional video and cleaner layout.

Over the past few years, we’ve learned that technology adoption requires a balance of careful planning and open-mindedness. We believe this mindset is key to our district’s long-term success, and to the success of our students.